Dr. Steven M. Kuznicki

Steve Kuznicki

Professor
Alberta Ingenuity Foundation Scholar
Canada Research Chair in Molecular Sieve Nanomaterials
7th Floor ECERF, Room 7-084M
9107 - 116 Street
Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4
Phone: 780.492.8819
Fax: 780.492.8958
Email

Research Areas: molecular sieves; molecular separations; adsorption; nanopore and nanometal synthesis

Biography

After a 20+ year career in industry, Dr. Kuznicki initiated a career in academia. Dr. Kuznicki is widely regarded as the world’s leading authority on mixed coordination molecular sieves. In recent years hundreds of authors from over 60 institutions in at least 20 countries have published patents or scholarly articles on these new materials. This area represents a fundamental scientific contribution of Dr. Kuznicki to microporous solids and nanotechnology.

A proven innovator, Dr. Kuznicki has documented well over 50 patented discoveries with many additional applications pending. His latest research involves a new class of molecular sieves that express the so called "Molecular Gates" effect. Constructed from mixed tetrahedral / octahedral metal oxides units, these materials provide a basis for new catalysts, new separation agents, ceramic membranes, new types of potential semi-conductors and optoelectric materials.

Research Interests

  • Molecular Sieves - New Structures and Applications: Forming the heart of hundreds of processes as catalysts, absorbents, ion-exchange and purification agents, molecular sieves are among the most important and valuable inorganic materials. Utilized in petroleum cracking for gasoline production, oxygen production from air, water purification by removing heavy metals and much more, these materials impact our lives. The definition of molecular sieves has grown to include new materials, which offer new possibilities, especially in energy related applications.

    A new class of molecular sieves we are exploring has unique properties that we are trying to exploit. Constructed from mixed tetrahedral / octahedral metal oxides units, theses materials provide a basis for new catalysts, new separation agents, ceramic membranes, new types of potential semi-conductors and optoelectric materials. These materials express the so called "Molecular Gates" effect were molecules with differences in size of only 0.1 Angstron (0.01 nanometer) can be separated by the uniform, controllable pores.
  • Molecular Gates: Precise, Controllable, Crystalline Pores: This is a new program with the central objectives of applying molecular sieves to:
    • Develop new separations agents for bitumen (tar sands) derived products,
    • Modify bitumen reactions by absorption and/or catalysis,
    • Create and explore new molecular sieve structures in advanced applications such as semi-conductors and energy applications.

    Video: Steve Kuznicki - Using molecular sieves to improve oilsands production